LA Rams cheerleaders break boundaries: first squad to include two males in Super Bowl LIII

Quinton+Peron+%28left%29+and+Napoleon+Jinnies+%28right%29+of+the+LA+Rams+were+the+first+NFL+male+cheerleaders+to+perform+at+a+Super+Bowl.
Back to Article
Back to Article

LA Rams cheerleaders break boundaries: first squad to include two males in Super Bowl LIII

Quinton Peron (left) and Napoleon Jinnies (right) of the LA Rams were the first NFL male cheerleaders to perform at a Super Bowl.

Quinton Peron (left) and Napoleon Jinnies (right) of the LA Rams were the first NFL male cheerleaders to perform at a Super Bowl.

Courtesy of Creative Commons

Quinton Peron (left) and Napoleon Jinnies (right) of the LA Rams were the first NFL male cheerleaders to perform at a Super Bowl.

Courtesy of Creative Commons

Courtesy of Creative Commons

Quinton Peron (left) and Napoleon Jinnies (right) of the LA Rams were the first NFL male cheerleaders to perform at a Super Bowl.

Megan Hess, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Super Bowl LIII will be remembered as one of many first-time occurrences. It was the lowest scoring Super Bowl of all time with a 13-3 final score. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady secured his record-breaking sixth ring and now two of the Los Angeles Rams cheerleaders made history of their own when they became the first men to perform in the Super Bowl.

Wearing the Rams blue and gold, classically trained dancers Napoleon Jinnies and Quinton Peron inspired many as they made their Super Bowl debut. Although the NFL has seen male stuntmen before, Jinnies and Peron were the first men to dance alongside their female counterparts at the big game.

“It’s been an upwards journey of excitement. It’s been the perfect season.”  Jinnes said, 28, in an interview with the LA Times.

Jinnies, a professional dancer and makeup artist, got the idea to audition for the squad from some coworkers who danced with him in a Disneyland show.

“We were just casually talking about auditions and I thought, ‘Why not just show up?’ ” he said.

Peron, a professional dancer and choreographer, got the idea while watching a Lakers game. He had danced with some of the Lakers’ cheerleaders before and even taught some of them. When he found out auditions for the Rams cheer squad were the next Sunday, he decided to go.

“I’m looking down at the Laker Girls and I thought, ‘Why can’t I do this?’ ” he said.

No men have ever auditioned for the Rams since they moved back to Los Angeles, but there is no rule against it. They received some looks when they first arrived at auditions, but their skill was immediately apparent to Rams officials and they were welcomed onto the team with open arms.

After surviving the audition process, Jinnies and Peron made their first appearance with the team in March 2018. It’s not surprising that Los Angeles, a city well-known for its diversity and inclusion, instantly fell in love with the two. Not only are they accepted by their fellow teammates, but they are fan-favorites.

The team has endured criticism from NFL fans who want to preserve the previously all-female squad, but the pair of dancers are not phased.

“Just to hear my dad say, ‘I’m proud of you, son,’ that’s all I need,” Peron said.

“If we can help inspire or motivate someone, it’s all worth it,” Jinnies said.

Their fearlessness has encouraged other teams to follow suit. In summer 2018, the New Orleans Saints hired Jesse Hernandez, their first male cheerleader. Hernandez said Peron and Jinnies were his inspiration to try out.

These two dancers have stolen the hearts of Los Angeles with their bright spirits and their lively performances. It seems only fitting that they closed out their groundbreaking season with a bang at the Super Bowl.