Diners encouraged to reuse containers

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Diners encouraged to reuse containers

The cafeteria has changed their policy for to-go containers, encouraging students to be more consciences of their usage of recyclable materials.

The cafeteria has changed their policy for to-go containers, encouraging students to be more consciences of their usage of recyclable materials.

The cafeteria has changed their policy for to-go containers, encouraging students to be more consciences of their usage of recyclable materials.

The cafeteria has changed their policy for to-go containers, encouraging students to be more consciences of their usage of recyclable materials.

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Diners on campus will no longer be asked whether they want their food ‘for here’ or ‘to go,’ as dining services have stopped providing to-go containers from behind the counter. As of this Monday, disposable containers have been made available to customers. The containers are in a central location in the cafeterias in Hunt Hall and the Ragsdale Center. Diners can also bring their own reusable containers.

“We’re going to force our faculty and students to make that choice,” Mike Smith, general manager of Bon Appétit, said. “We’re going through so many and I want someone to make their own decision.”

Smith said on average Bon Appétit distributes 800 disposable containers a day, and half of the people who get their food to-go eat inside the cafeteria. Last spring, Bon Appétit started using compostable to-go containers that cost 45-50 cents each. In comparison, the previous disposable boxes cost 17-20 cents each.

“They are more expensive and way more people are using them,” Smith said of the to-go boxes.

Additionally, customers can participate in the reusable clamshell program, which offers hard plastic containers that diners can purchase for $6.