Hillary Clinton is ready for 2016 without dirty laundry to air

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Even though former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has not confirmed or denied her intentions to run for president in 2016, controversy has already stricken her campaign. According to The New York Times, Clinton conducted all government business during her time at the State Department through a personal email account.

This is a big deal because, under federal law, emails and other documents received by government officials are considered government records that are open to the public. However, these emails will not deter Clinton from running for the White House, because late Wednesday night she tweeted her support to release the emails.

“I want the public to see my email. I asked State to release them. They said they will review them for release as soon as possible,” Clinton tweeted. Before Clinton went to Twitter, the House Select Committee on Benghazi subpoenaed her emails for transparency reasons.

If Clinton truly had something to hide, she would not be willing to release the emails. In fact, she probably would be attempting to say something about national security is at stake if the messages are released.

Whatever is contained in Clinton’s email, [email protected], the public probably already knows it. 

Remember, this is a woman who has been in the public eye for decades, so her dirty laundry is all out there. 

While Republicans are salivating at the thought of Clinton-less 2016 race, they better stop because nothing can possibly prevent this juggernaut of a campaign from happening.

What this email debacle truly shows is that the Clinton machine has been making moves towards the presidency since President Barack Obama nominated his former rival to the post. 

Even the server that the emails used was stored at the Clintons’ New York home which is protected by Secret Service agents, according to The Verge.

The fact remains that Clinton should have just used her government address or forwarded all her emails to that address to comply with the rules. If that had happened during Clinton’s four-year tenure as Secretary of State, she would not have had to waste 129 characters on Twitter.

Again, this does nothing to hurt Clinton. If the GOP — or potential Democratic rivals — wants to hurl attacks at her, so be it, but she can withstand it. 

This is the woman who has been criticized on numerous topics since entering politics with her husband, Bill, in 1976.

Clinton must answer why she — or most likely someone on her team — decided to use a personal email account. The tweet signals that Clinton is willing to talk about the emails.