Filmmaker leads promising career after sneaking into festivals

Though the audience will appreciate Haney for what he did, some may wonder if major music festivals will catch on and start implementing more security measures following this documentary.

Though the audience will appreciate Haney for what he did, some may wonder if major music festivals will catch on and start implementing more security measures following this documentary.

Staff Writer

Have you ever dreamed about going to festivals like Bonnaroo, Coachella and Glastonbury but didn’t have the money to buy a ticket?

Marcus Haney proves that the impossible is possible in his documentary, “No Cameras Allowed,” in which he snuck into different major music festivals.

But Haney didn’t just sneak in. 

He had different cameras and pretended to be press so he would be right next to the stages. Sometimes he even got to meet the artists.

Throughout the documentary, the audience gets to witness Haney’s wild journey and see his failures and successes in sneaking into festivals and becoming a photographer and filmmaker.

Overall, the documentary offers an outlook on festivals and on how to make it in the music and photography industry in an nontraditional way. 

It also touches on how Haney constantly struggles with doing what he loves and staying connected with his family and friends.

Haney isn’t famous per se, but his photos and footage from festivals, tours and other events have been used for promotion and have been used in “Rolling Stone” and on HBO.

He has become friends with different bands, including Mumford and Sons, with whom he toured for a while.

Though the audience will appreciate Haney for what he did, some may wonder if major music festivals will catch on and start implementing more security measures following this documentary.

At one point, Haney sneaks 16 people into Austin City Limits, including one of his best friends who is in a wheelchair. 

Like Haney, the people he snuck in with also photographed musicians performing at ACL from close ranges.

Haney and his friends weren’t always successful; he was kicked out of a few festivals before, but he was never arrested.

All in all, the documentary depicts modern-day adventures and highlights how important music is today.

If you’re a major music fan and love music festivals, this film is highly recommended. You can watch it for free on MTV’s website.

You can also view some of Marcus’ work on his personal website.