Feminists exploit children to sell shirts, fight sexism

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Feminists exploit children to sell shirts, fight sexism

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful.

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful.

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful.

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful.

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Each week, we explore both sides of a current issue through opposing Viewpoints. The alternate editorial for this week’s Face Off can be found here: “Viral video of children cursing meant to shed light on sexism.”

Recently, the clothing company FCKH8 released a video titled “Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism” featuring young girls clad in princess outfits and looking every bit the part. That image is quickly shattered as the girls drop f-bombs alongside gender inequality facts. A quick glance at the video’s comments section on YouTube gives an idea of the kind of division the campaign has created.

While the issues the girls and one boy highlight are no doubt important ones for individuals to be aware of, the video relies heavily on the shock value of the youngsters using provocative language. As the video now sits at well over a million views, its popularity isn’t in doubt. What can be debated, is the motivation and appropriateness of having small children curse to sell a product.

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful. The humor of a toddler being caught on camera accidentally cursing is in the fact that it’s out of the ordinary by the child’s own will. In the case of the FCKH8 video, the cursing is not an organic instance of child’s faux pas; it’s a calculated and scripted means to elicit a response from the viewer. If you find you’re not offended, you’ll share or mention it. If you are offended, you’ll still share and mention it. Either way, the company is succeeding in gaining more exposure.

While the video makes the case that the f-word is less offensive than some of the issues women face, the decision to use young children to communicate this could have been just as effectively communicated without using children as provocateurs. The points that the children raise through the video are appalling enough all their own.

As the video progresses, two adult women do interrupt the expletive-laced presentation with the true aim of FCKH8. To sell t-shirts. While $5 of each shirt sold is to go to charity, the company is still aiming to sell a product.

A product peddled on the derisive language of adults, spouted by otherwise innocent looking children. Ironically enough, the adults are the only people featured in the video who do not use the adult language.

Even if the entire focus of the video was to shed more light on the very real issues that women face, these obscene inequalities are overshadowed by the obscene language.

Exploiting children to sell clothing is pretty unsavory in and of itself.

Recently, the clothing company FCKH8 released a video titled “Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism” featuring young girls clad in princess outfits and looking every bit the part. That image is quickly shattered as the girls drop f-bombs alongside gender inequality facts. A quick glance at the video’s comments section on YouTube gives an idea of the kind of division the campaign has created.

While the issues the girls and one boy highlight are no doubt important ones for individuals to be aware of, the video relies heavily on the shock value of the youngsters using provocative language. As the video now sits at well over a million views, its popularity isn’t in doubt. What can be debated, is the motivation and appropriateness of having small children curse to sell a product.

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful. The humor of a toddler being caught on camera accidentally cursing is in the fact that it’s out of the ordinary by the child’s own will. In the case of the FCKH8 video, the cursing is not an organic instance of child’s faux pas; it’s a calculated and scripted means to elicit a response from the viewer. If you find you’re not offended, you’ll share or mention it. If you are offended, you’ll still share and mention it. Either way, the company is succeeding in gaining more exposure.

While the video makes the case that the f-word is less offensive than some of the issues women face, the decision to use young children to communicate this could have been just as effectively communicated without using children as provocateurs. The points that the children raise through the video are appalling enough all their own.

As the video progresses, two adult women do interrupt the expletive-laced presentation with the true aim of FCKH8. To sell t-shirts. While five dollars of each shirt sold is to go to charity, the company is still aiming to sell a product. A product peddled on the derisive language of adults, spouted by otherwise innocent looking children. Ironically enough, the adults are the only people featured in the video who do not use the adult language.

Even if the entire focus of the video was to shed more light on the very real issues that women face, these obscene inequalities are overshadowed by the obscene language. Exploiting children to sell clothing is pretty unsavory in and of itself. The fact that women are paid less than men for the same work, or the fact that 1-in-5 women will be a victim of sexual assault are startling enough. Let’s not detract from that by scripting children foul-mouthed rants.

Recently, the clothing company FCKH8 released a video titled “Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism” featuring young girls clad in princess outfits and looking every bit the part. That image is quickly shattered as the girls drop f-bombs alongside gender inequality facts. A quick glance at the video’s comments section on YouTube gives an idea of the kind of division the campaign has created.

While the issues the girls and one boy highlight are no doubt important ones for individuals to be aware of, the video relies heavily on the shock value of the youngsters using provocative language. As the video now sits at well over a million views, its popularity isn’t in doubt. What can be debated, is the motivation and appropriateness of having small children curse to sell a product.

While at first mildly entertaining, the repetitive use of expletives begins to feel forced and frankly, distasteful. The humor of a toddler being caught on camera accidentally cursing is in the fact that it’s out of the ordinary by the child’s own will. In the case of the FCKH8 video, the cursing is not an organic instance of child’s faux pas; it’s a calculated and scripted means to elicit a response from the viewer. If you find you’re not offended, you’ll share or mention it. If you are offended, you’ll still share and mention it. Either way, the company is succeeding in gaining more exposure.

While the video makes the case that the f-word is less offensive than some of the issues women face, the decision to use young children to communicate this could have been just as effectively communicated without using children as provocateurs. The points that the children raise through the video are appalling enough all their own.

As the video progresses, two adult women do interrupt the expletive-laced presentation with the true aim of FCKH8. To sell t-shirts. While five dollars of each shirt sold is to go to charity, the company is still aiming to sell a product. A product peddled on the derisive language of adults, spouted by otherwise innocent looking children. Ironically enough, the adults are the only people featured in the video who do not use the adult language.

Even if the entire focus of the video was to shed more light on the very real issues that women face, these obscene inequalities are overshadowed by the obscene language. Exploiting children to sell clothing is pretty unsavory in and of itself. The fact that women are paid less than men for the same work, or the fact that 1-in-5 women will be a victim of sexual assault are startling enough. Let’s not detract from that by scripting children foul-mouthed rants.