Parking ticket appeal system facilitated through online process

Although+students+who+appeal+their+ticket+must+appear+in+person%2C+now+they+don%E2%80%99t+have+to+go+to+the+SGA+office+in+Student+Life+to+file+for+an+appeal.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Parking ticket appeal system facilitated through online process

Although students who appeal their ticket must appear in person, now they don’t have to go to the SGA office in Student Life to file for an appeal.

Although students who appeal their ticket must appear in person, now they don’t have to go to the SGA office in Student Life to file for an appeal.

Although students who appeal their ticket must appear in person, now they don’t have to go to the SGA office in Student Life to file for an appeal.

Although students who appeal their ticket must appear in person, now they don’t have to go to the SGA office in Student Life to file for an appeal.

Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Student Government Association and University Police Department recently switched part of the ticket appeal process to an online form.

The change is expected to make the appeal process more efficient for students.

According to SGA’s Court of Appeals, now a student who receives a citation from UPD must submit their appeal online through Collegiate Link within 10 academic school days of the date of the infraction. The Court of Appeals will then contact the student by email with a date to appear in court. After the court date, the student will be notified within seven days of the court’s decision.

Although students who appeal their ticket must appear in person, now they don’t have to go to the SGA office in Student Life to file for an appeal.

Sen. Victoria Godinez elaborated on why SGA decided to make this change.

“Before, students had to go to the SGA office and many really didn’t know where that was. So, moving the process electronically would be easier for everyone to appeal,” Godinez said.

“It’s much more accessible for busy students,” sophomore Daja Shealey said. “Nobody really knows about (the issue).”

Follow Nicole for more!